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Thoughts and ideas from Atlas Bodyworks
The history of the weight loss industry and how things are different today
September 3, 2019 at 12:00 AM
by Atlas Bodyworks
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At Atlas Bodyworks, we specialize in taking modern approaches to weight loss. Thanks to advances in technology, dropping pounds and losing inches is easier than ever. But it hasn't always been this way. Throughout history, people have taken weird and wonderful approaches to losing weight. We're here to help you learn more about them, as well as the modern tactics that are available.

Weight loss started with the Ancient Greeks

Although the ancients were generally more accepting of different body sizes than we are today, they still liked to promote weight loss when necessary. The father of medicine himself, Hippocrates, recommended eating light and emollient foods. He also recommended that dieters exercise or engage in physically demanding work.

While Hippocrates was dishing out fairly sensible advice, dieting altered dramatically in the centuries that followed. Interestingly, William the Conquerer tried to lose weight by following a liquid diet of only alcohol. Later on, Lord Byron attempted to shed a few pounds by existing on water and vinegar. And in the 19th century, some noble English gentlemen followed meat-rich diets and ditched carbohydrates. All this suggests that none of the fads we see today are particularly new, nor is our generation the first to turn toward questionable dieting practices.

The weight loss industry has always been a little brutal

In the 20th century, companies of all types and sizes knew that consumers would flock their way if they could lose weight by buying their products. In the 1920s, the cigarette brand Lucky Strike announced that those who smoked their products would maintain a slim waistline. The idea that cigarettes promote weight loss has turned into a myth that continues today.

Between the 1930s and 1950s, a series of rapid weight loss tactics emerged. The grapefruit diet found popularity in the 1930s, which was probably handy given the financial state of the world. By the 1950s, the cabbage soup diet was capturing the nation's imagination. Even doctors were on board with such crazes, which promoted the idea that they were safe. And just in case your stomach wasn't turning already -- Hollywood actresses would try and lose weight in the fifties with the tapeworm diet.

Diet pills from the seventies onward

After discovering that some medications came with the side effect of appetite suppression, doctors began prescribing them for weight loss. With many of the drugs featuring anxiety as a side effect, this practice was soon abandoned.

After diet pills lost their popularity, they gave way to protein-heavy diets. From Atkins to Southbeach, each one claimed to take a fresh approach to a carb-free lifestyle.

So, what's different today?

At Atlas Bodyworks, we help our clients take a holistic approach to weight loss. For those who are seeking rapid results, we offer services such as the M'LIS Contouring Wrap to help you drop inches ahead of a big event. Or if you're searching for something that will complement your current steady weight loss plan, you can visit our infrared sauna. It has enough space for up to six people, making it easier for you to accelerate your weight loss with your friends.

The Atlas Bodyworks team also likes to embrace advanced approaches. For example, our Venus Legacy LPG will help you melt fat on your lunch break. Using a handheld device, we'll target stubborn areas of fat to encourage them to breakdown so the body can absorb them.

Although the weight loss industry has always been a little quirky, we believe things are changing for the better. If you're interested in how we can help you, call 703 560 1122.